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25. PDX. IDK what I'm doing with my life. My blog is named after my cat.


'I'm sick of following my dreams. I'm just going to ask them where they're going and hook up with them later.'
  - Mitch Hedberg


THINGS I LIKE >> cats; good tv (see below); oregon/pnw; feminism; amazing art; jewelry; tattoos; photography; insects; fungi; abandoned places

GOOD TV >> parks and recreation; community; futurama; bob's burgers; arrested development; 30 rock; party down; it's always sunny in philadelphia; doctor who; breaking bad; buffy/angel/dollhouse/firefly/anything-that-joss-whedon-touches
posted Apr.23.14 + 7 notes + reblog

(Source: tinarannosaurus)

Your friend, Faraday, said you were from the future. I need to know if he was telling the truth. “Dude, that’s ridiculous.”

(Source: summerfinns)

(Source: pleatedjeans)

beckyblackbooks:

Mortal enemies.

(Source: youtube.com)

berenzero:

socimages:

How to lie with statistics: The relationship between Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and gun deaths.
At Junk Charts, Kaiser Fung drew my attention to a graph released by Reuters.  It is so deeply misleading that I loathe to expose your eyeballs to it.  So, I offer you the mishmash above.
The original figure is on the left.  It counts the number of gun deaths in Florida.  A line rises, bounces a little, reaches a 2nd highest peak labeled “2005, Florida enacted its ‘Stand Your Ground’ law,” and falls precipitously.
What do you see?
Most people see a huge fall-off in the number of gun deaths after Stand Your Ground was passed.  But that’s not what the graph shows.  A quick look at the vertical axis reveals that the gun deaths are counted from top (0) to bottom (800).  The highest peaks are the fewest gun deaths and the lowest ones are the most.  A rise in the line, in other words, reveals a reduction in gun deaths.  The graph on the right — flipped both horizontally and vertically — is more intuitive to most: a rising line reflects a rise in the number of gun deaths and a dropping a drop.
The proper conclusion, then, is that gun deaths skyrocketed after Stand Your Ground was enacted.
This example is a great reminder that we bring our own assumptions to our reading of any illustration of data.  The original graph may have broken convention, making the intuitive read of the image incorrect, but the data is, presumably, sound.  It’s our responsibility, then, to always do our due diligence in absorbing information.  The alternative is to be duped.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

What the fuck, people…

berenzero:

socimages:

How to lie with statistics: The relationship between Florida’s Stand Your Ground law and gun deaths.

At Junk Charts, Kaiser Fung drew my attention to a graph released by Reuters.  It is so deeply misleading that I loathe to expose your eyeballs to it.  So, I offer you the mishmash above.

The original figure is on the left.  It counts the number of gun deaths in Florida.  A line rises, bounces a little, reaches a 2nd highest peak labeled “2005, Florida enacted its ‘Stand Your Ground’ law,” and falls precipitously.

What do you see?

Most people see a huge fall-off in the number of gun deaths after Stand Your Ground was passed.  But that’s not what the graph shows.  A quick look at the vertical axis reveals that the gun deaths are counted from top (0) to bottom (800).  The highest peaks are the fewest gun deaths and the lowest ones are the most.  A rise in the line, in other words, reveals a reduction in gun deaths.  The graph on the right — flipped both horizontally and vertically — is more intuitive to most: a rising line reflects a rise in the number of gun deaths and a dropping a drop.

The proper conclusion, then, is that gun deaths skyrocketed after Stand Your Ground was enacted.

This example is a great reminder that we bring our own assumptions to our reading of any illustration of data.  The original graph may have broken convention, making the intuitive read of the image incorrect, but the data is, presumably, sound.  It’s our responsibility, then, to always do our due diligence in absorbing information.  The alternative is to be duped.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

What the fuck, people…

sassbama:

iconic

(Source: reginaa-phalange)

Artist: Pixies
Track Name: "Here Comes Your Man"
Played: 17985 times

gilbertbielschmidt:

i was joking but then i checked and i—-

(Source: orangeskins)

(Source: potsi-miau)

jackiedenardo:

HELLA YEAH

jackiedenardo:

HELLA YEAH

(Source: joaovazjewellery)

vmagazine:

Every spring, the entire county of Luoping will transform into a brilliant golden sea of flowers.

The small county of Luoping lies in the relatively underdeveloped eastern part of the Yunnan province, neighboring Guizhou and Guangxi provinces. It sits 137 miles (220 km) east of the capital Kunming,China.

In Luoping, the local plains in the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau, is home to around 32,865 acres (133 million sq m) of canola flowers every spring.  Spring is also honey season, the blooming canola (rapeseed) flowers attract bees and the area has become a national base for raising bees and processing honey. A few miles to the north of Luoping is NiuJie, here the flowers are grown in circular rings following the contours of the slopes similar to rice terraces.

The 9 Dragon Waterfall (Jiulong Waterfalls) is nearby, boasting a group of majestic waterfalls, the tallest which is nearly 184 feet (56m) high and 360 feet (110m) wide.  Along the southeast portion of Luoping runs the Duoyi River which is formed by the water from five underground springs, the 7-½ mile (12km) river is surrounded by bamboo.

Best time of the year to visit is mid-February to early April.

The best view is atop Jinjifeng / Jinjiling (Golden Rooster Hill); many photographers set up on the top to shoot the sunrise and sunset over the sea of flowers.

Luoping in Yunnan Province, Wuyuan in Jiangxi Province and Anshun in Guizhou Province are all popular destinations for flower fans.

photos: ©Rachel Yin / ©Anne Berlin /YNA/ACT all rights reserved